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of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release of sunni prisoners. shi-ite prime minister nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 500 million web users will have to provide their real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a new way for china's communist leaders to censor their critics. >> ( translated ): since the internet came into china, the chinese government has been repeatedly imposing restrictive measures, such as shielding, blocking and banning. it has even spent billions of dollars to build a firewall against overseas sites.
. back in 2003, i got medicaid payments by the government to help the state's struggling with their medicaid costs. $20 billion will able to spread across the states to help them because they were unable to meet the rising costs. in 2017, they're going to have a larger share of the costs. we need that is taken care of. they did not know what the cost was. they put a number in as a place holder and it looked like i was doing something for my state when i wasn't. i was trying to get it for all the states. that is what happened. i wanted to get it knocked out -- if people wanted an opt out. the supreme court gave that. this got used against me as though i was trying to do something i should not have. i was not. the interesting thing is i was asked to do this by the nebraska governor. i did not get a thank you from another governor, who was from another state. >> during that time, you experienced the radio talk-show host circuit and the cable tv circuit. what was that time like and what do you think the echo chamber in american politics today does? >> it is a difficult thing
a denunciation of big government liberalism or big government programs. you can see his anti-communism is evolving, his cultural view is evolving. he has not yet gained or acquired the tax-cut philosophy which fit so nicely into his optimistic outlook of empowering individuals to determine their own lives. >> saturday night at 8:00 eastern, craig shirley on the political campaigns of ronald reagan, part of four days of american history tv, right through new year's day, on c- span3. >> you think of washington before the civil war. you think slavery was well entrenched. black people were miserable. that is not true at all. in washington, washington had about 30,000 people as a city. 12,000 of them were black. the majority free, no slaves. >> what led to the first race riots? jefferson morley recounts what happened, part of what today's through new year's day on c- span2's book tv. >> "washington journal" continues. host: damian paletta join us here at the table. thank you for joining us. this is the fourth time that congress has had a post- christmas lame duck session. what doe
of people who believe in limited government and a government that represents we, the people, and not we, the elites. and i really think that it's archaic and dinosaur-like of folks like sam donaldson who have long been out of power. i mean we broke the liberal media monopoly years ago, and this is really their death row call, not ours. thanks, sam. >> good to see you. thank you for being with us. happy new year. >> you bet. >> that's all the time we have left for the special fiscal cliff edition of hannity. thanks for being with us. let not your heart be troubled because the news continues and greta is standing by to go live on the record. greta, take it away. >> this news alert. an emergency meeting tomorrow at the white house. president barack obama, speaker of the house john boehner, house minority leader nancy pelosi, harry reid and mitch mcconnell. can they make a deal or can they do their jobs or is this just more political drama? >> we want an agreement. >> the count down is midnight. the start of a new year. >> we are going over the cliff because frankly i believe it's what the
the government to cut back spending in other areas in exchange for relief money. the new york and the new jersey governors ask for bigger aid packages. >>> the powerful winter storm swept through half of the country and left many in dark. arkansas, 15-inchs of snow caused widespread daniel to power lines and cutting electricity to 200,000 customers. chicago has already reached 500 homicides before the end of this year. the highest level in four years. windy city is desperate to lower its murder rate. correspondent mike tobin looks at one initiative to supporters hope will do just that. [ siren ] >> guy in the middle of the street. looks shot. >> gangland shooting part of every evening in chicago, the gun control debate is ongoing. solution passed by the cook county board of collisioners another tax. $25 on every handgun sold. this gun store owner says it's tax against the legal gun owners. >> the new tax is sold with the idea it would offset public cost of medical care for shooting victims. aconfidencing to the board president own numbers that cost is shy of $35 million. estimated revenue is $60
. this morning they approve and extension of the farm intelligence v it allows the government to continue intercepting overseas communication. it extends legal immunity phone companies that help the government wiretap the domestic phone calls. president obama plans to sign the bill. when the senate is back we are expecting senators to continued work on the $60 billion hurricane sandy relief package. negotiations continue on avoiding the so-called fiscal cliff. both parties head to the white house today to discuss the fiscal cliff with the president. it's at 3:00 p.m. eastern in the oval office. senate in recess until 2:00 p.m. eastern when the senate reconveneses, live coverage here on c-span2. >>> and right now on c-span2 a conversation with nebraska senator ben nelson who is retiring after two terms. >>> retiring senator nebraska ben tell me sop. years that began with the 2003 recount and reended with re-election of president obama. if you could think of the adjective to describe these years what would it be? >> clearly interesting. challenging. sometimes totally frustrating. but also f
to actually solve the problem. so we can do this, it's the government that's the problem, not the economy and not even-- stuart: they're suppose today work for us. look, here is what i think is going to happen. i think that we will get some kind of last minute deal, which raises taxes on people who are successful, making serious money. forget about any spending cuts, i don't think that's going to happen and they make promises, but they're not actually going to do it and they'll simply ignore the debt. i think that's what's going to happen. do you agree? >> i'll take that bet. i don't think that's going to happen. i don't think that republicans will agree to any tax increases without spending cuts. i think they've been clear about that. stuart: we go over the cliff. >> they're not going to cave. i think they're going to extend the deed line and see credit downgrade. and i think we're going to fight about this through 2013 unfortunately. stuart: and as if falling off the fiscal cliff isn't enough to push us off another recession, it could of course. tomorrow at midnight a longshoremen's str
a message from the tea party members everywhere. destroying government is not good politics. you are acting against the majority rule right now. you are trying to bring down the majority government by obstruction. people will remember. people who believe in government will remember it. people who believe in national defense and social security and medicare. they will know which party is trying to destroy working democracy in order to pursue its political ends. they will know who respects the voter and who thumbs his nose at the voter. we go over this cliff and you will not have to ask for whom the bell tolls, it will be tolling for you. leading off tonight, josh green and chris frates of "national journal." you don't have to be as clear as i but try, gentlemen, tonight. it looks to me like one party, once again it's asymmetric. both parties are not screwing around, one is. is that true? >> i think both parties want to go over the cliff. >> both want to go over the cliff? who will get blamed? >> i think republicans will get blamed, but i think republicans at this point fear casting a career-
can move forward? >> well, first of all, we have to be able to govern. we have to have an adult conversation, getting people in the room who actually want to solve this problem. and i think it's very important to step back and see the fact that we have already -- there are three parts of this deficit reduction stool. we've already in the past two years passed $1.6 trillion in spending cuts. we've passed over $700 billion in savings in medicare through reforms like cutting back on overpayments to insurance companies. the one piece of this puzzle that we've not been able to get any support for is making sure that the wealthiest among us help solve this problem by being willing to pay a little bit more to be part of the solution. so we have sent a bill to the house back in july, bipartisan bill that says what -- everybody says they don't want middle-class families to have their taxes go up, well, fine. why don't we start with something we can agree on, which is that? and just pass that. why doesn't the house just pass that? but as we know, the speaker couldn't even pass his own pla
thing the next government needs to do is actually nothing. if it does nothing, if it doesn't reverse the reforms -- >> what's interesting is what berlusconi is campaigning on is austerity. he's running on an ant anti-austerity pro eu package. while it's untenable, it does have a certain amount of certainly backtracking the fiscal returns for them. >> exactly. this property tax, i think that's a cause for concern. if you were to repeal that, the fiscal position on would be unsustainable and he would have to raise taxes elsewhere to make up for that. that would be some messy negotiations with him on a european level. markets would be very concerned already heading into the elections. the more noise we hear, the higher italian borrowing costs would be and if italian borrowing costs rise, one of the very important parameters which led to this drop in debt to gdp over these 15 years heading into the crisis would not be fulfilled any more and italy's position would be unsustainable because of all that noise. >> it sounds like a catalyst should this fall into place in 2013. that still remai
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
communications are looked at by the government. people want amendments. unfortunately congress once again is acting at the last minute trying to renew something about to expire and there is probably not the time to do revisions that are necessary. that's a problem here. harris: because critics want this to be revised as you just put it. the white house doesn't. it wants it to pass the way it is. a lot of people are in favor of it because it is helping to keep us safe since there is homegrown terror in the united states and we need to find it. i want to if which have the words put it up on the screen. kentucky senator rand paul had this to say on the senate floor yesterday. and what he was basically saying is that this interferes and disputes the power of the fourth amendment. and that it needs to be changed. again, dan, you say we may not see any changes to it because the deadline is tuesday? >> it is really important to note that even the supporters of renewing acknowledge there needs to be reform. there needs to be more oversight. we need to know more how the fisa court works. we want m
" to postpone a government default. the government is on track to hit its borrowing limit on monday, he said with no prospect of congressional action to raise the limit. here now to help us unravel what's going on is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international. todd, welcome back. decode this for us. are the players privately as bleak about the prospects as their public statement suggests? >> not as bleak, margaret, but bleaker than they were even a week ago and that's not terribly encouraging. the president as you reported is flying back to washington last night and some members of congress are coming back earlier than others. there will be some meetings here, there have to be some meetings between the principals and the president. there are a couple of options in the last couple of days even though it seems like five days is terribly, terribly short. there shall bills floating out there to keep tax rates where they're at for people making $250,000 and below. that could slide around. there's a senate bill that floats around. there's the pres
into if you let the government default or whatever goes on this weekend, because basically defense spending will be cut and we'll have new payroll taxes and all tax rates will go up on income tax and estate taxes and all the bad stuff will happen, and how that's good politics. >> look, politicians are creatures of narrow self-interest. from the self-interested standpoint of a republican house member from a safe district who fears a primary challenge, yes, it's better for them to wait three days, cast -- go over the cliff, cast a vote to cut taxes and basically screw all the people who are going to be affected by it preserving their own jobs than it is to agree to a tax increase now and risk the wrath of the tea party right two years from now. >> chris, let me ask you about another possible, i hope it doesn't happen. next tuesday or next wednesday when the market reopens on january 2nd and they fully realize at that point that this cliff has been gone over and the congress has failed to meet its own targets which it set itself when it set this cliff up, who will pay the price if, say, the ma
the government. take a look at this. they got her back in the business. it's pretty awesome, right? the party of procrastination can take a lesson from the small-business owner in staten island, new york. congress has nothing to show for itself after two years. coming up next, how the massive gains in the fiscal cliff could impact your 401k and the economy. stay with us want to know what i did in the last five hours? i played a round of golf. then i read a book while teaching myself how to play guitar; ran ten miles while knitng myself a sweater; jumped out of a plane. finally, i became a ping pong master while recording my debut album. how you ask? with 5-hour energy. i get hours of energy now -- no crash later. wait to see the next five hours. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people whgets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur gerri: big tax hikes set to take effect on january 1. what is the m
a deep channel. >>> and america's population growth is slowing down. the government says it's due to lower birth rates during the economic recession and lower immigration numbers. as we start the new year, there will be 315 million people in the united states. the population, though, has grown less than .75% since 2010. so a slower rate of growth. still, 315 million people is -- >> seems like enough people in some places, that's for sure. thanks, lisa. >>> hopes have been crushed and families in the making ripped apart. a new law bans americans from adopting russian children. ng tom about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. >>> from what we surmise, this meeting at the white house between the presiden
the mexican government using our court system to fight arizona's sb1070 immigration law. it wants a u.s. circuit court of appeals to block part the of the law that makes it illegal to protect illegal immigrants. mexicans say it's anti-immigration and antimexico. jamie weinstein says it's anti-illegal immigration. you listen to this and -- break it down. so mexico wants the arizona courts to say it's illegal to ban harboring illegal mexicans. do i have that right? >> actually, the -- in arizona court, a lower court put this law on hold. it's before the u.s. court much appeals in san francisco where the mexican government filed an amicus brief saying the law, it's illegal to harbor illegal immigrants but only if you're committing a crime or in the process of committing a crime in addition to that. that's the only people in violation. if you're already committing a crime or having committed a crime and harboring illegal immigrants. the brief says the law, one, harms diplomatic relation with g united states and prevents the mexican government from negotiating with the united states becaus
,000 a year would pay an extra two grand or so to the government. gregg: the big question, do lawmakers hope to get anything out of the last minute fiscal cliff talks or is it just for show? democratic congressman chris van hollen is the ranking member of the house budget committee. he will be joining us live coming up in the next hour what he really thinks is going on. patti ann: well the u.s. economy meanwhile could suffer yet another major blow. looming strikes at ports from next sass to boston are threatening to put thousands of americans out of work. with potential losses for u.s. businesses ranging in the billions. >> the port of baltimore is one of maryland's largest economic generators. any type of work action that may result in a suspension or stoppage of work would have an adverse effect. >> we handle more cars, we handle more farm and construction equipment than any other u.s. port. patti ann: we're learning that adverse effect could take a toll on the economy. fox business network's stuart varney has more for us on that this morning. good morning, stu. >> good morning, patti ann.
on go bankrupt or the governments they are based on go bankrupt, and people are saying that might happen here. >> you could have a credit incident, but we're not going to destroy the faith in credit of the u.s. government. david: we already have. are you kidding, larry? we already have. >> i doubt it because, really, if the credit were destroyed, the cost of finance at the margin would be going up, and the cost of finance at the margin for the federal government is going down. >> larry, consumers are pulling back, a consumer that's pulling back, not spending as much, that is not going out and driving and consuming oil, the confidence seems eroded before a decision is made in dc. we don't even need a decision. david: larry, i know what you say about interest rates, overriding factor thinking about investment and how much cash, but, again, right for now, our credit rating is the best in the worlding but it's a lousy world of credit. that's the problem is that with all this money printing going on around the world, i'm wondering when that comes back to bite us. >> well, that's why you don't
this morning, saying the russian government's politically motivated decision will reduce adoption possibilities for children who are now under institutional care. were further concerned about statements that adoptions already under way may be stopped and hope that the russian government will allow those children who have already met and bonded with their future parents to finish the necessary legal procedures so that they can join their families. and as matthew said, there are just about 50 children that are in the pipeline right now. what senior state department officials are telling me is that they're hoping to get at least those through the pipeline, those children who have already met these parents to be able to be united with them, and then they'll work on trying to lift the whole ban, suzanne. >> elise, is there any kind of advice they're giving those families, those americans, who have already met with their potential children? what should they be doing now? >> reporter: well, right now all they can do, suzanne, is sit tight. they really -- the state department is working on these childr
that problem? >> all we have to do to balance the budget in 10 years limit the growth of government spending so that the budget climbs by an average 2.5% a year. in my mind, this isn't about the short term because whatever speed bump we go over we're going to go over. in the long run that is what i'm worried about, how big is government? how much of our economy's resources will be diverted and consumed by government? because i don't want to become greece or france or one of these stagnant slow growth welfare states. think evidence is very clear that fiscal policy does matter for an economy's performance. doesn't mean we have a recession if taxes go up but it does mean that government will be bigger and our growth rate in the long run maybe instead of 2.7, it is 2.6. that doesn't sound like much but because of compounding it adds up. adam: dan, i don't think there is any danger we become greece or france in a lot of ways. we're not a socialist country yet and greece is a whole different ball of wax. rich, the discussion about the economy, the spending cuts that they're talking about do put peopl
on the capital. they're search-rich and is a former french colony. they say the government is not honoring a cease five including release of political leaders. >> back in the u.s., the storm has come and gone and at least 16 deaths are blamed on the weather. in hard-hit arkansas, more than 135 homes and businesses remain without power. edward lawrence reporting. >> reporter: snow blowers and plows are pushing through a foot of snow in the upstate new york. the icy snow is a challenge for those who only have a shovel. >> it's been brutal. >> reporter: the storm drops several inches in the northeast and new england making it hard to get out and get around. streets are a problem in west virginia and maryland. this woman skit off the road and hit a mailbox. >> we just lost control. yeah, pretty scary. >> reporter: the weather is part of the same mass av system that crossed the country this week dumping snow from the west coast to the east coast and creating powerful tornadoes in the south. bad weather continues to delay flights in the northeast. that's bad news for holiday travelers trying to
happens january 1st. here's why they get sales from government contracts. that's the deal. it's not just the lockheed martins of the world. you'll see in here, humana, other health care companies, of course, medical device companies hit with the tax, but they have striker, for example, and there's a lot of sales from government contracts. you'll see in here, look at that, motorola, holdings in and waste management companies like waste management and republic services, ashley. ashley: what are the stock prices on the companies, iz? >> good point. goldman sachs warned since 2011 when that debt ceiling crisis hit in the summer of 2011 that triggered the fiscal cliff learning that the companies could under perform, but there's another wall street player, and that's fidelity saying watch for the banks, not just because they are under pressure as they track the general economy, but it's because business capital spending is down as of the third quarter, really went south, worried about that and activity dropping off by 20% versus the prior year, and banks make a lot of fee money. people, you k
to cut elsewhere. >> reporter: without new legislation, government price supports for milk will revert to 1949 levels. back then, the process was more laborious, and farmers needed a higher subsidy to cover their costs. dan summer, professor of agricultural economics at the university of california davis, says the new price of milk will be far above what it now costs dairy farmers to produce it. >> it really will be just chaos. nobody really knows how to act. >> reporter: so we would go back to this old farm bill, which would force the government to buy milk at an extremely high price. >> that's right. >> reporter: this could be a windfall for dairy farmers. >> here's the problem for dairy farmers: they don't want chaos in the milk market. it sounds good-- "gee, everybody will double or triple the price"-- but how much milk would people buy at that price? >> reporter: nobody will pay it. >> nobody will pay it. >> reporter: shoppers for milk today couldn't understand why congress can't at least solve this problem. linda vella: >> they all need to be fired. and if we want to continue to
to be part of the deliberative process. he heads an entirely separate branch of government with an altogether different purpose. i think we need to go back to the way the government was designed to operate, and that is the deliberative function, in the legislative branch, both the house and the senate, acting independently. and then resolving their differences through conference. that process works, it works very well. this business of a couple of legislative leaders and the president going behind closed doors, coming up with some clever scheme, and then dropping it in the laps of the congress for a take it or leave it vote produces bad policy. in fact, bad process always produces bad policy, and that's what we're seeing. >> congressman, we've been seeing virtually no progress to date, but i hope folks have your optimism about not going over the cliff because of the disastrous implications. congressman mcclintock, thanks for coming on. >>> chuck hagel hasn't even been formally nominated to be the next defense secretary, and he's already taking right hooks from members of his own party, but do
stores and its sister company of christian themed book stores sued the government claiming it violated the religious rights of the company's other thans, evangelical christians. they requested emergency relief from the emergency contraception mandate after a lower court denied their request for a religious exemption. the into you rule goes into effect on new year's day. although sotomayor didn't rule on the marities of the case her refusal to grant a temporary stay of the hhs contra isception rule is onerous. starting next week the company will either have to pay a daily fine of $1.3 million or stop offering their employees healthcare, or abide by the rule and violate their religious conscience. now, it is worth noteing that when she sat on o the second circuit court of appeals, judge sotomayor ruled in favor of the religious rights of a muslim inmate who was denied a ramadan meal in prison. she was asked about that case and the religious liberty issue at her confirmation hearing. >> it is a very important and central part of our democratic society that we do give freedom of religion,
amounts to 8 1/2 days of government spending. he's willing to raise everybody's taxes and hold the country hostage over the issue and the economy hostage because he so wants his rate increase for 8 1/2 days of spending? tell me where the sense in that is. >> you know, you know, i'll give you this. you are strong on principle, sean. but let me tell you something, you are way, way out of line with the thinking of the american people. it's something like 60% now, i think it's in the mid-50% of americans who approve of president obama's handling of the budget negotiations. the president cut his vacation short. and you talk about the senate doing nothing. >> let me ask you this. >> the senate has passed a bill that would give an extension of the bush tax cuts to 98% of americans, sean. 98%. john boehner, a guy i like very much, but john boehner's ratings are now lower than nancy please sis. that's what the american people think about the way the republicans have handled it. >> the senate hasn't done their job in 1300 days and somehow, brent, the blame is on the republicans who did pass a bill,
for is increasing taxes that will only pay for 8 1/2 days of government spending. now president obama has not been a leader on this. he's not been serious. he's been acting weak and, of course, clinging to his radical ideology. enough is enough. maybe it's time to have the republicans call the president's bluff. let him take the country over the fiscal cliff if he so chews. republicans were elected to get the fiscal house in order. maybe it's time to stand up for your kids, your grandchildren. maybe they should dig in their heels and say they are looking out for the future and future generations. maybe now is is a time to take a principle stand and say they are not going to let washington continue with the out of control spending, the debts and deficit. maybe now at this moment maybe that's the right thing to do. joining me now with reaction to the developing steer are congressman loui gomert and -- go ahead. >> i can totally with him that he cannot imagine our consciouses in the house because you would have to have one to imagine ours, and he's shown repeatedly over three years of no budget? come
to trim the size and scope of government, whether it was the bush tax cuts a decade ago or whether it was the debate over the debility ceiling just over a year ago is going to likely end up as an effort to expand the size and scope of government. that's something that can only happen in washington. >> eric: both of those guys make very good points. a lot of people are asking why would you say go over the fiscal cliff? i have a lot to lose if we go over the fiscal cliff. my taxes would go up. i'm heavily invested in the stock market. it will probably take a big hit. but in the long run, the only way to solve america's debt problem -- we have a debt problem. we have a very bad debt problem. we're on our way to $20 trillion in debt, maybe 25 in the next five to ten years. the only way to fix that is go over the fiscal cliff 'cause clearly democrats don't want to cut spending. they'll have to be forced into that and the only way that happens is hit the sequestration, the things that the fiscal cliff will bring of the that's why. i'll take the medicine, the pain now for a healthier econ
this is insanity and the threat to the economy is not a reasonable way to govern. >> mike, how -- again, not to oversimplify this thing, but how did we get here? i think most folks following this fairly closely assumed that as is the case with a lot of things in washington, d.c. that at the 11th hour withere will ba deal that gets done. there are a lot of folks involved in the deal making saying, it won't happen this time. >> well, look. i think ari is right in one real respect which is they set this up, you know, more than a year ago as a way of trying to provide counter pressure to the political pressures that exist across the board on all of these lawmakers and these individual districts. they thought that the pressure, the scare tactic that they put on themselves of deep defense cuts on the one side and deep cuts to domestic programs on the other side forces everybody to the table. it clearly turned out that in the wake of the election we had, the pressures in their districts, the threat of being primaried especially on the republican side meant that folks aren't willing to move as
to see i increase my interest because these guys can't run a government, you're looking at going toward a recession where we're playing politics in washington. this is very serious. this is not just beltway rhetoric here. i think that people need to understand to the point of calling their congressional representative in outrage today saying, we should not be at this point. they're playing politics with the actual livelihood of families. this is not something that it will be all right a week or two or three or four. we start to go down that cliff, we don't know whether the momentum downward is going to be very, very damaging. >> yeah. >> maybe. >> you got na smirk on your face. >> maybe. i agree with the reverend that they're playing politics with livelihoods, because it is a huge risk. you're right about that. i disagree a little bit on the sort of dramatic, immediate impact of it. what we could get -- this is a possibility, and i'm trying to be optimistic because it's towards the end of the year. it's been crummy for a lot of people. we could get a deal the third week of january where
is not the right solution. we can still count on government to disappoint us each and every time that we need their support, that's a beginning, yet we've had two 10% corrections already this year in stocks, including dividends. they are up close to 14%, and this type of environment, where you're probably going to see another 3% to 5% selloff because of this fiscal announce, fiscal irritation, and when you get that, you should take that money and put it to work. simply because when you look at corporate america, the average company, bill, is generating a 16% to 17% return on equity, record free cash margins and a federal reserve that has the pedal to the metal. what you and i have talked about before repeatedly, $4 in taxes for every dollar in phantom spending cuts. that's fiscal irritation, but the health of corporate america will be what ultimately prevails. >> sounds like david has been reading your book, rick santelli. >> it does. >> big fan of rick. >> this is such a perverse world we live in, okay. let's look as what's happening. down 158 in stocks and that pushed the ten-year yield und
value, at the turn of the 20th century where government spending was 9% of gdp, we're now at 25%. there are some that say, take what we give you and retrofit government to the size of 19% or 20%. do that first. he just wants to shrink what it's grown to, this unwielding federal government that -- don't you think 25% needs to come down? >> well, part of that is cyclical. >> okay. so at 3%? >> 21, 22. >> i would say 22. >> so we have to get it down to 20.5. >> the three big beasts in the budget remain medicare/medicaid, social security and defense. you have to cut almost everything else to zero to get close to balance or to make a big difference. so i think in today's world, given that those entitlements, even if you reform them and cut back back will increase as people like us eventually retire. it seems to me that sizing the government for something around 22 or so is probably doable. but not easy to get to. because you still have to have major cuts and major long titlement reform to get there. >> you see one of the major ceo guys, and i'm not going to quote which one, said yest
your bank that goes to the federal government. but you can go online and with free holiday shipping purchase a high capacity magazine. even the law enforcement in the communities have no way of know ing a large number of weapons, perhaps a bullet proof vest. that might send off a few alarms. making it harder to sexercise te right to vote. we should think that people are more responsible owning a gun than casting a ballot. that is part of what is being revealed. >> i want to go to one other finding in this study about this. it is about the notion of people need guns for protection. >> there is no evidence that a gun in the home reduces the likelihood of severe iity durin break in. it is actually going to be usable in a way that will protect you. >> to the contrary. those same studies have shown, they are are more likely to go through if there is a gun in the house. what is more likely to happen is you are going to get shot. what happened is, they didn't kill the shooter. the shooter killed themselves. they were in able to get to it. >> they looked at the mass events. if somebody had
in india. the indian government looking into whether wal-mart's lobbying activities in the u.s. violated indian laws. shares of wal-mart closed fractionally higher. smith and wesson is buying back an additional $15 million worth of stock, on top of the $20 million repurchase program it recently completed. smith and wesson's shares have fallen nearly 10% since the newtown connecticut shootings. investors bought up gold today, as a safe place to park money while washington lawmakers spar over the fiscal cliff. the precious metal settled $3 hier at $1,663 an ounce. gold prices are on pace for an annual rise of about 6%, the smallest annual gain since 2008. and, supply concerns pushed palladium prices to a nine-month high. investors are worried that tight supplies from the world's top two producers and steady demand from the auto sector could mean higher prices in 2013. it settled at $708 an ounce: over the past year the metal has rising about 7.5%. and finally, for the second day in row the ishares emerging market e.t.f. ended higher. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> susie: once upon
, saddam's military in kuwait and return right, full governance back to the citizens of kuwait. >> his father once said -- told him, he said, the day i was born that boy is going to west point. it was literally a job he was born to do. boy, did he do it well. the nation is remembering him today. thank you for helping us do that, general spider marks. happy holidays to you. >> you as well. >>> former president george h.w. bush has a message for his admirers around the world. he's not going anywhere. in a message in thursday, his chief of staff said the 41st president's condition is not dire. becker said mr. bush has every intention of staying put and that we can "put the harps back in the closet." the 88-year-old mr. bush is in the intensive care unit of a houston hospital where he's receiving treatment for an elevated fever. >> still has his sense of human. >>> vladimir putin has signed a continue versional bill banning u.s. citizens from adopting russian children. the decision raising tensions between the two countries, seen for retaliation for a new law in the u.s. that seeks to puni
of government in american life, that's why it is so hard to get to a deal. >> how dramatic. who would think talking about money and fiscal issues would garner so much drama, jessica. >> reporter: well, it is washington. and it is a lot at stake. it is about people's taxes, and, you know, the social safety net in america. it is the difference between democrats and republicans. >> yeah. we're going to talk more about the money now. thank you, jessica yellin. appreciate it. to new york now, joining us rick neuman, chief business correspondent for "u.s. news & world report." i want to ask you about the tax increase if there is no deal and tax rates rise, when would workers begin to see that reflekr reflected in their paychecks? when does the pain start? >> this is not one tax hike. this is about nine different sets of taxes. and the one that would go up right away is the payroll tax. that was cut temporarily in 2 009, cut by two percentage points and will go back up by two percentage points and that would come out of workers' paychecks right off the bat. it would add up to something like $60, $
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